Doritos' Super Bowl Ad Finalists Hoping to Crunch the Competition


By University Alliance on January 21, 2014

Internet Marketing Evolving for Multitasking Consumers

Armchair quarterbacks once again will need to make space for armchair advertisers during the upcoming Super Bowl.

Five finalists are competing to be the MVPs of Doritos’ eighth annual “Crash the Super Bowl” ad contest, which drew entries from thousands of hopefuls around the globe. Two of the 30-second commercials will be aired during Fox’s broadcast of Super Bowl XLVIII on Feb. 2 – one will be picked by online voters; the other by Doritos.

The fan favorite will receive $1 million and a trip to the game at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. The company’s pick also goes to the game and will take home $50,000.

Both winners will also get to hang out on the set of the upcoming movie Marvel’s The Avengers: Age of Ultron, according to Doritos.

Each year, advertisers and marketers update their playbooks for the Super Bowl Sunday ad blitz, which has been shifting heavily toward online and social media avenues. That’s partly a reflection of the rising cost of running TV ads during the game – upward of $4 million for a 30-second slot this year. (Fox executives told The New York Times in December that all of the advertising spots already had been purchased.)

Over the past decade, more than 130 marketers have spent in excess of $2 billion on Super Bowl network ads, Kantar Media reported recently. The top five spenders between 2009 and 2013 were: Anheuser-Busch InBev ($145.9 million); Pepsico Inc. ($97 million); Hyundai Corp. ($67.4 million); Chrysler Group ($64.3 million); and Coca-Cola Co. ($62.3 million).

The shift to Internet-based marketing also is a result of the changing nature of how the nation consumes entertainment and spends its money. About 73% of Internet users ages 18 or older use social networking sites, the Pew Research Center reported in December 2013.

Meanwhile, digital multitasking has become the new norm, with 77% of TV viewers simultaneously using their desktop, laptop or tablet computer, according to an April 2013 survey by Accenture.

During last year’s Super Bowl, which attracted about 108 million TV viewers in the United States, Twitter users sent more than 24 million tweets – and that’s excluding those tweeted out during commercial breaks. A 30-minute power outage at the Superdome in New Orleans allowed some brands to audible by sending impromptu tweets about their offerings.

“This might be a good time [to] think about alternative programming,” PBS tweeted to its followers, inviting them to watch Downton Abbey instead.

This year brings a new twist in advertisers’ attempts to separate consumers from their cash, as clothing retailer H&M introduces “t-commerce” to the roster of Super Bowl-ad innovations. In addition to running a 30-second spot featuring soccer star David Beckham, the Swedish company will unveil technology that allows U.S. viewers with a Samsung Smart TV to use their remote control to purchase items from the David Beckham Bodywear collection during the game.

“We’re bringing our A-game, the world's top style icon and the best quality bodywear to the largest stage in the world,” Daniel Kulle, head of H&M North America, said in a January 2014 press release.

Category: Internet Marketing